Vinda Dravid, Structural Design Intern, Sterling Consultancy Service Pvt. Ltd. Mumbai

India is poised to embrace high-rise buildings as it leaves behind traditional low-rises to make room the growing population. Due to the re-development boom, a substantial part of Mumbai's population is undergoing a transition from low-rises to high-rise buildings. The objective of this paper is to analyse the psychology of the occupants, their expectations and emotional interaction with a high-rise building. The study is based on surveys and interviews with people belonging to various classes of Indian society who have undergone this transition in recent years. The results of this psychological study may help improve planning, amenities and services for such structures. is undergoing a transition from low-rises to high-rise buildings. The objective of this paper is to analyse the psychology of the occupants, their expectations and emotional interaction with a high-rise building. The study is based on surveys and interviews with people belonging to various classes of Indian society who have undergone this transition in recent years. The results of this psychological study may help improve planning, amenities and services for such structures.

Introduction

Mumbai is a mega metropolitan city that is home to millions of Indians hailing from humble backgrounds and smaller towns and villages from across India. Mumbai has become the melting pot of India, embracing diversity, enticing immigrants with opportunities and promising a brighter future. Land has now become a rare commodity, resulting in an alarming escalation in land rates and thus housing costs. In such a situation, building tall is the only way to build at all.

Need for Sustainable Vertical Development

Tall Buildings consume a massive amount of resources and are a great strain on both the immediate and global environment. The product of this investment of resources needs to have a greater shelf life if the overall impact on the environment has to be controlled. A longer shelf life simply means a more durable and sustainable structure – one that will be relevant to the present as well as to future generations. In today's 'use and throw' age, this concept of semi-permanency may well mean that we must go back to the basics and start designing products for human needs rather than for an economic showdown or display of prowess.

When defining sustainability criteria of a product, the usefulness and efficiency of the product in relation to human needs is of vital importance. People tend to stick to things that make them feel comfortable and that keep them in tune with the environment. In the design of tall buildings, this human aspect of emotions, feelings, physical and psychological interactions need to have a more significant role in the sustainability rating. A tall building can be made more socially sustainable if it is designed for the needs of its future inhabitants and their natural instincts.

NBM&CW August 2015